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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
careful with our science that we don't convict, right, people who are ultimately innocent or in the reverse, that we don't ultimately exonerate people who are indeed guilty. >> if you want to learn more go to cnn.com/justice. we have a lot of great news for you there. i'm barack obama and i approve this message. romney: "it's time to stand up to the cheaters" vo: tough on china? not mitt romney. when a flood of chinese tires threatened a thousand american jobs... it was president obama who stood up to china and protected american workers. mitt romney attacked obama's decision... said standing up to china was "bad for the nation and our workers." how can mitt romney take on the cheaters... when he's taking their side? boring. boring. [ jack ] after lauren broke up with me, i went to the citi private pass page and decided to be...not boring. that's how i met marilyn... giada... really good. yes! [ jack ] ...and alicia. ♪ this girl is on fire [ male announcer ] use any citi card to get the benefits of private pass. more concerts, more events, more experiences. [ jack ] hey,
fake science behind them that is very popular in the anti-choice movement. >> when you combine that, laura, with the fact that at first when these legitimate rape comments came out, republicans started running from them, now they are stuck with them, let me give you an example. the chair of the gop, rins priebus, tried to distance himself from akin. here he is answering a reporter's question. >> if he stays in, is y'all's position eventually going to change in. >> no. no. no. he can be tied and we're not going to send him a penny. >> but now he's changed his tune. when he was asked if he thought akin was a better opg than mccaskill, priebus says is, quote, i have an obligation to make sure we win as many seats in the senate as possible. i mean, he's a real problem. >> there it is, reverend. i think a month ago republicans wouldn't touch akin with a ten-foot pole. i think the reason wasn't because they were so genuinely offended by akin's remarks but because they had no chance to win the senate race. they encouraged him to get out of the race hoping to replace them with a republican
, of course. but have they dictated the outcome of an election? a lot of political science suggests only twice. in the 1960s, 1960 election when richard nixon came out looking very haggard against the sharp and attractive john f. kennedy, and in 2000 when gore was condescending toward george w. bush. the point is, more than zingers, what seems to affect the outcome is your general likability. how you come across. last point, carol, i saw newt gingrich give advice to mitt romney. he said that these debates. his expert told him it's 85% visual, how you look, 10% how you say something, your tone, and 5%, only 5% what you actually say. that would certainly reinforce this likability prism. >> well, that 5%'s kind of depressing. >> it is. >> well, let me ask you this about likability. remember in 2008, obama had a problem with likability and he's turned that around. he's now the more likable candidate. there is a danger to him to appear unlikable in this debate if he gets too snippy or too condescending or too professorial. >> absolutely because he's coming from a position of authority or power. eve
moderator. jenna: like him on that. gregg: let's recruit him. sounds like something out of science fiction but scientists say they developed medical devices that dissolve safely inside the body. we'll have that story coming up or annuity over 10 or even 20 years? call imperial structured settlements. the experts at imperial can convert your long-term payout into a lump sum of cash today. jenna: some very interesting medical news for you. scientists say they have developed medical devices that do the work they're designed for on side your body and then, just dissolve. what happens to them? that is the question we have for dr. ernest patty, senior attending physician at st. barna bass hospital in the bronx. doctor, what are we talking about here? medical devices that dissolve, come on. >> small electronic devices. call them transient electronics made out of silicon and magnesium. they're covered in a silk cocoon. they use the silk because the silk is absorbed by the body as well as silicon and magnesium. jenna: what is scenario where someone may have a medical device you're describing? >> th
of science fiction. but it is quite, quite real. take a look at this. this is an ear that doctors at johns hopkins grew on the arm of a cancer patient. an ear growing on an arm. senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen joins us now live from atlanta. elizabeth, we've been looking at this picture all morning. explain it to me. what's going on here? >> john, i don't know if you saw it, i went like this, still even though i've seen it so many times. it's such an eye-popping image. what's going on here is that a woman named sherry walter had cancer, skin cancer on her ear, and they needed to remove almost all of her outer ear. plus some of the structures that were inside because the cancer had spread. and so what they did was they thought, wow, i wonder if we could grow her an ear. they took some cartilage from her ribs and fashioned it into the shape of an ear, but this doesn't look like the real ear, it needed skin. so they put the cartilage that was shaped into an ear under her arm and they waited four months. the skin grew over it. they took it out, and they put it on her head and she
skills here in the united states. so i need you to help me recruit 100,000 new math and science teachers, improve early childhood education, give two million workers the chance to learn skills the community college that will lead directly to a job. help us work with colleges and universities like this one to cut the growth of tuition costs so that you guys aren't overburdened with debt when you graduate. that's a goal we can meet. we can choose that future for america. we're going to have to do something about the deficit. but we've got to do it in a smart way. i said i'd cut the deficit by $4 trillion through a mix of spending cuts and higher taxes on the wealthiest of americans. i've already worked with republicans to cut a trillion dollars in spending. i'm willing to do more. i want to reform the tax code so it's simple and fair. but i'm also going to ask the wealthiest among us to pay a higher tax on incomes over $250,000. the same rate we had when bill clinton was president created 23 million new jobs, went from deficit to surplus. and look, the whole economy does well when taxes ar
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)